We realize that we are truly fortunate to live in a community whose primary goal is the same as ours: to create a learning environment that provides atypical experiences for every Colt. 

This is only possible through open and consistent dialogue between home and school.
As we continue to explore ways to partner with home as a support around reading, we wanted to share some easily understood and readily implemented ways you can increase your child’s level of understanding.

You have asked about how to find age appropriate and level appropriate books for your child to read. The following lists provides some ways to access them. Additionally the Public Library System in Forsyth is well aware of the leveling systems like Fountas & Pinnell (F&P) that we use as well as information about the Lexile Levels. So, they would be glad to assist as well. 

This certainly is not an exhaustive list, in fact, one of the best ways to select a book for your child to read is to have your child talk about what interests him/her and provide multiple ways for your child to have access to readings about the topic of interest. (i.e.- magazines, newspaper articles, fiction and non- fictional books, etc.) there are children’s version of some of the more popular magazines such as: Time For Kids, Sports Illustrated For Kids, Weekly Reader, National Geographic For Kids, etc.

You can help your child by reading out loud with them so that they hear:

  • How the reader stops at punctuation, uses voice inflections, 
  • Reads fluently, 
  • You can also have your child tell you three things they learned about what they just read 
  • Ask them to create three questions that can be answered after someone reads the passage, chapter,
    etc. 
  • Have them draw a picture of what they read. (This strategy can also provide insight as to what
    your child actually got from the reading. Lots of specifics shown in their drawing indicate a
    higher likelihood of student understanding, while the reverse might be true. 
  • Let your kids see you reading while they are reading, 
  • Point out careers that require some type of reading to be done that requires strong reading skills,
  • Have your child talk a lot as they are reading so they can hear and often clarify any misread words,
  • Ask your child if what they read makes sense,
  • Have they read or heard anything that matches what they read/learned?
    Notice that the suggestions listed do not include questions like “Who’s the main character? Where did the story take place? What’s the problem in the story?” These are basic questions that give an insight to your reader and knowing these pieces are important, but we must be intentional about asking questions of more
    depth and require the learner to provide answers of more than one word responses,
  • Why did the author write this book?
  • How would you have changed the ending?
  • If you were the character in the story how would you change the setting, and would have the
    problem be the same?
  • How would the solution have changed if you were the main character? If the setting had changed.? The goal is to begin getting readers to make connections and problem solve in a variety of ways.
     

As you can readily see, there are many ways to support your child in reading without requiring that you have read their selections or have a deep level of understanding on your part as to specific reading skills.

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Hello, Colts.

It is always my honor to serve as the principal of KME. We truly are family, and I cannot tell you enough about the importance of home and schools working together. Again, thank you for partnering with us to create the type of environment where our Colts are glad to be and have the opportunity for unique learning experiences. 

A common question from you is about ways to help your child succeed and we want to help answer that question for you. This communication is the first in a series designed to provide specific information over a broad range of topics in supporting your child. We will also include a link where you can submit your questions and/or suggestions for upcoming topics. 

When focusing on providing support at home with reading, there is not a lack of suggestions and resources that are out there. Our intent is to provide ways you can reinforce reading skills at home in both a timely and readily applicable manner. For example, you may hear things like your child is on a “Level G and needs to be on “Level J” based on the Fountas & Pinnell (F&P) leveling system that we use. The question that we at KME are asking is “Does this type of explanation –Level G to Level J- really provide useful information to the learner and to you, the parents?” 

We realize that we need to communicate the specific reading characteristics that are aligned to a particular level. Linked is a resource based on the F&P leveling system which provides easily understood and helpful ways that you can support your child.